The IUCN Red data book (2004) lists Leopard along with 8 subspecies   Leopard: Panthera pardus  (Africa) Least Concern North   Chinese   Leopard:   Panthera   pardus   japonensis    (North China) Endangered EN C2a Sri Lankan Leopard: Panthera pardus kotiya  (Sri Lanka) Endangered EN C2a Javan Leopard: Panthera pardus melas  (Java, Indonesia) Endangered EN C2a Arabian Leopard:   Panthera pardus nimr  (Saudi Arabia) Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Amur   Leopard:    Panthera   pardus   orientalis    (Amur   Mountains, Russia) Critically endangered CR A2c; D North   African   (Barbary)   Leopard:   Panthera   pardus   panthera (Atlas Mountains, Morocco) Critically endangered CR C2a (i) North   Persian   (Iranian)   Leopard:    Panthera   pardus   saxicolor   (Iran) Endangered EN C2a Anatolian Leopard:   Panthera pardus tullian (Turkey, Caucasus) Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Other subspecies recorded in the past Caucasus Leopard: Panthera pardus ciscaucasica Caucasus Mountains, Turkey, Georgia, Russia Indochinese Leopard: Panthera pardus delacouri China Indian Leopard: Panthera pardus fusca India Panthera pardus millardi Kashmir Panthera pardus pernigra Nepal, Kashmir Zanzibar Leopard: Panthera pardus adersi Zanzibar, Unguja Sinai Leopard:   Panthera pardus jarvisi Sinai Peninsula Somali Leopard:   Panthera pardus nanopardus Somalia, Ethiopia Panthera pardus pardus Ethiopia, Sudan, Kenya, Congo Panthera pardus suahelica East Africa Panthera pardus melanotica Southern Africa Panthera pardus sindica South West Africa What are the present numbers of existing Leopard species? Leopard:   Panthera pardus Unknown Least Concern North Chinese Leopard:   Panthera pardus japonensis Unknown Endangered EN C2a Sri Lankan Leopard:   Panthera pardus kotiya Unknown Endangered EN C2a Javan Leopard:   Panther pardus melas Unknown Endangered EN C2a North Persian (Iranian) Leopard:   Panthera pardus saxicolor Unknown Endangered EN C2a Arabian Leopard: Panthera pardus nimr 15-100 Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Amur Leopard:   Panthera pardus orientalis 25-40 Critically endangered CR A2c; D North African (Barbary) Leopard:   Panthera pardus panthera 0 (extinct?)-250 Last viewed 1993 Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Anatolian Leopard:   Panthera pardus tullian 0 (extinct?)-15 Last viewed 1974 Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Zanzibar Leopard:   Panthera pardus adersi Extinct? Last viewed 1980 Population on island of Unguja is thought to still exist. The   status   of   most   Leopard   populations   remains   a   mystery   until it   appears   to   be   too   late   as   is   happening   with   the   Amur   Leopard in Russia and China.
What are the main areas of concern and what is being done about the status of these Leopards? An   article   published   in   the   EWT   Conservation   magazine   52/2005   was   titled “The Leopard Controversy: Common Cat or Conservation Concern?” The   workshop   was   spurred   on   by   the   fact   that   CITES   increased   the   quotas   for hunting    leopard    at    a    meeting    held    in    Bankok    in    October    2004.    Quota allocations   were   increased   from   75   to   150   in   South Africa   and   from   100-250   in Namibia.    This    decision    was    said    to    be    based    on    insufficient    ecological information   that   guides   ‘appropriate’   decision-making   on   leopard   utilisation.   It was   stated   that   there   is   a   lack   of   scientific   data   determining   quotas   on   a regional   and   national   level   and   there   is   huge   uncertainty   on   the   effects   of removal on the demographics of a leopard population. A   second   major   issue   raised   was   that   of   farmer-predator   conflicts.   It   was stated    that    there    is    a    lack    of    resources    to    deal    with    problem    animal management   across   the   country   and   accurate   information   of   illegal   take-off   is almost     non-existent.     The     facts     regarding     leopard     losses     are     virtually impossible   to   determine,   yet   quotas   for   hunting   these   incredible   creatures   are allowed   to   increase.   What   are   the   implications   to   a   leopard   population   and   to all   species   diversity   when   leopards   are   removed   from   an   area?   So   many questions   need   answering   and   CBSGSA   stated   that   accurate   knowledge   on leopard    numbers,    population    sizes,    distribution    and    trends    are    seriously lacking   and   management   decisions   regarding   the   future   of   the   species   are constantly   being   based   on   the   little   that   is   available.   Reasonable   estimates   on all   these   aspects   of   leopards   needs   to   be   formulated   to   effectively   conserve the   species.   Major   threats   and   conservation   priorities   for   Leopards   and   their habitat   need   to   be   identified   as   the   leopard   is   said   to   be   the   world’s   most persecuted big cat. In    order    for    South    Africa    to    make    sound    conservation    or    management decisions   regarding   the   fate   of   the   Leopard,   sufficient   data   on   Leopard   biology, ecological    carrying    capacity,    population    density,    distribution    and    dynamics needs   to   be   formulated. The   information   gathered   by   individuals   is   of   no   use   to the   species   if   it   is   not   shared   cohesively   and   it   is   vital   that   this   occurs   on   a global   level. All   data   needs   to   be   collated   in   order   to   address   priority   gaps   and not   only   as   a   nation   but   as   a   planet,   urgent   attention   can   thus   be   paid   to   the creature   that   is   both   the   most   persecuted   and   one   of   the   most   valuable   on earth. Leopard   Research   projects   are   ongoing   in   many   of   the   areas   where   Leopards still   exist.   In   the   Southern   Africa   subregion,   the   Cape   Leopard   Trust   can   be found   in   the   Cederberg   Mountains   of   the   Western   Cape,   the   Mun-Ya-Wana Leopard   Project   in   Natal   and   the   GLP   Erindi   in   Namibia.   Other   projects   include that   at   Karongwe   Game   Reserve,   the   Waterberg   Carnivore   Project,   Namibia and   many   years   of   ongoing   data   collection   at   Londolozi   in   the   Sabi   Sand Game   Reserve.   Due   to   the   dedicated   people   that   make   these   projects   a reality,   valuable   information   is   uncovered   daily   and   a   better   understanding   of Leopard   ecology   is   sure   to   help   projects   worldwide.   With   sound   methods   and means   of   collecting   accurate   data   on   Leopard   numbers,   distribution   maps   can be    updated    regularly,    population    numbers    can    be    assessed    and    sound decisions   can   be   made   in   the   future   regarding   the   management   of   all   the existing subspecies. Projects   in   other   areas   of   the   world   include   WWF   working   in   Russia   with   the Amur   Leopard   as   well   as   a   project   in   the   Caucasus   subregion.   It   is   not   easy   to find   information   on   all   Leopard   projects   around   the   world   and   one   aim   of   the GLP    is    to    aid    in    the    information    sharing    and    development    of    awareness through   communication.   We   are   hoping   to   achieve   this   through   media   such   as the Internet via sites like http://www.globalleopard.com An   important   consideration   to   be   made   is   that   concern   for   Leopards   differs from   one   place   to   another   and   an   important   factor   often   overlooked   is   that   of human    concern    where    Leopards    exist.    Through    proper    understanding    of Leopard   behaviour,   there   may   be   a   way   for   man   and   cat   to   live   side   by   side with   minimal   conflict.   This   has   been   proven   in   areas   such   as   the   Sabi   Sands and   local   surrounding   communities   where   people   and   predators   co-exist   in harmony   and   where   they   in   fact   benefit   each   other.   This   can   only   be   achieved however,   if   concern   for   people   and   domestic   stock   go   hand   in   hand   with addressing the concerns about Leopards. Understanding Leopard ecology Many   people   working   on   Leopard   research   around   the   world   are   still   trying   to gather     accurate     information     on     Leopard     numbers,     population     sizes, distribution    and    behaviour.    It    has    been    said    that    “insufficient    ecological information    is    guiding    inappropriate    decision    making    regarding    Leopard utilization”. The   field   work   of   the   GLP   at   Londolozi   Private   Game   Reserve   in   the   Sabi Sands   and   Erindi   Game   Reserve   in   Namibia   aims   to   contribute   vital   base   line information   on   Leopard   ecology   through   data   capture   and   analysis.   The   first field   project   was   that   at   Londolozi. This   is   ongoing   data   collection   that   began   in 1978   contributing   30   years   of   information   collected   through   direct   observations of habituated Leopards. In    late    2007    the    GLP    Erindi    began    as    the    reserve    completely    ended    the hunting   in   the   area. As   the   Leopards   of   Erindi   and   the   people   begin   to   develop a   relationship,   records   of   how   long   it   takes   for   the   population   to   recover   and for individuals to “trust” people will be determined as part of the studies. Understanding human/leopard relationships in specific environments Human/leopard   relations   differ   hugely   from   area   to   area,   country   to   country.   In Africa,   major   concerns   with   Leopard   are   those   regarding   conflict   mostly   with domestic   stock.   In   countries   like   India,   the   problem   is   similar   in   many   ways   but there is the added conflict regarding people themselves and the predators. Every   area   of   the   world   still   housing   Leopard   populations   has   its   own   concerns for   the   cats   and   the   people.   It   is   vital   that   relations   be   understood   in   order   for Leopard   research   globally   to   benefit   more   than   a   single   population.   The   GLP will   use   2   very   different   areas   for   comparison   work   and   the   dream   of   the   future is to expand this knowledge worldwide. GLP FOCUS Gathering and sharing of information on leopard subspecies globally: A   major   focus   of   the   GLP   is   to   offer   ways   for   people   to   share   any   information on   Leopards   that   they   feel   is   important.   We   hope   to   form   contact   with   other people   around   the   world   that   have   an   interest   in   ensuring   survival   of   these cats into the future. The   first   major   project   being   planned   involves   the   local   people   of Afrca   and   the critically    endangered   Amur    Leopard    of    Russia.    The    trackers    of    Londolozi played   a   vital   role   in   the   habituation   of   Leopards   of   the   Sabi   Sands   area   where today   some   of   the   very   best   wildlife   viewing   is   available,   and   it   would   be   a huge   inspiration   for   them   to   see   how   there   tracking   skills   have   already   and   can benefit   other   Leopards,   not   only   in   Africa   but   all   over   the   planet.   In   the   same light,   perhaps   the   tracking   team   will   have   some   ideas   of   their   own   on   how other    Leopard    populations    can    be    followed    more    easily    and    located    for research and protection in the future. Accurate distribution information: Through   sharing   of   information   and   good   sound   research   techniques   from around   the   globe   and   projects   such   as   that   of   getting   the   highly   skilled   trackers into   remote   areas,   more   accurate   data   especially   on   Leopard   subspecies   and distribution   will   only   improve.   This   information   should   be   far   easier   to   find   and if   every   person   involved   with   Leopards   or   even   those   that   simply   have   a passion    for    them,    shared    what    they    knew,    a    global    awareness    would    be created. Awareness    is    the    first    step    towards    protection    and    understanding    of    all creatures. Accurate   information   on   the   numbers   of   subspecies   both   in   the   wild   and in captivity: If   Leopard   ecology   was   well   understood,   there   would   be   far   more   accurate information   on   the   status   of   these   cats   worldwide.   The   Leopard   is   renowned for   being   extremely   elusive   and   difficult   to   find   and   especially   to   count.   With teamwork,   new   and   improved   methods   for   counting   Leopards   will   arise   and through   better   understanding,   other   methods   of   determining   population   and status    of    these    creatures    will    ensure    that    utilization    is    sustainable    and management   decisions   made   regarding   the   fate   of   the   Leopard   will   be   done so based on accurate information. Identification   of   the   main   areas   of   concern   and   existing   projects   working to gather information about the populations in various areas: Through   the   identification   of   main   areas   of   concern,   the   story   of   people   out there   in   the   wilderness   trying   to   make   a   difference   with   very   little   help   can   be heard.   Funding   for   research   in   remote   areas   is   always   difficult   to   come   by. The GLP   would   like   to   be   part   of   making   sure   that   the   stories   of   those   working   to better   understand   Leopards   are   easy   to   find   and   heard   by   everyone! There   are so   many   people   in   the   world   who   would   like   to   make   a   difference   to   the   lives   of other    creatures.    If    these    people    can    easily    access    the    information    on    all projects   and   the   phenomenal   researchers   conducting   them,   then   perhaps   help and   funding   will   become   easier   to   access.   If   people   know   and   believe   in   what is   happening   “out   of   site”,   out   there   in   the   remote   areas   of   the   world,   they   are able   to   be   a   part   of   making   a   real   difference.   Each   one   of   us   has   a   contribution to make, no matter how small it may seem. Ongoing    Leopard    research    in    various    areas    to    gather    and    process information on the ecology of Leopards: The   purpose   of   research   is   to   ensure   that   information   gathered   through   the GLP   projects   is   done   so   in   the   correct   way   and   in   a   format   that   can   be beneficial   to   all   those   working   with   these   incredible   cats   in   the   present   and   in the   also   in   the   future.   Yes,   we   would   like   to   know   every   thing   that   there   is   to know   about   Leopards   but   if   this   information   is   gathered   and   not   shared   in   the right   way,   it   will   be   of   no   use   to   future   Leopard   populations.   The   “scientific” approach   will   ensure   that   the   information   gathered   over   many   life   times,   can be used constructively. Gathering   of   information   to   create   an   understanding   on   the   relationship between Leopard and humans in different areas of the world: Part   of   the   research   project   at   Erindi   is   to   build   relations   between   Leopards and   people   in   such   a   way   that   the   cats   accept   man   into   their   life.   The   process of   habituation   will   allow   guests   of   the   future   to   view   these   creatures   in   their natural   habitat   without   disturbing   them   in   any   way.   Through   habituation,   the Leopards   can   “earn”   a   living   and   ensure   that   their   home   remains   in   a   state where they can dwell safely today and also tomorrow. Natasha de Woronin ©
© The Global Leopard Project
GLOBAL LEOPARD PROJECT www.globalleopard.com The Global Leopard Project
The IUCN Red data book (2004) lists Leopard along with 8 subspecies   Leopard: Panthera pardus  (Africa) Least Concern North Chinese Leopard: Panthera pardus japonensis  (North China) Endangered EN C2a Sri Lankan Leopard: Panthera pardus kotiya  (Sri Lanka) Endangered EN C2a Javan Leopard: Panthera pardus melas  (Java, Indonesia) Endangered EN C2a Arabian Leopard:   Panthera pardus nimr  (Saudi Arabia) Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Amur Leopard:   Panthera pardus orientalis  (Amur Mountains, Russia) Critically endangered CR A2c; D North   African   (Barbary)   Leopard:   Panthera   pardus   panthera   (Atlas Mountains, Morocco) Critically endangered CR C2a (i) North Persian (Iranian) Leopard:   Panthera pardus saxicolor  (Iran) Endangered EN C2a Anatolian Leopard:   Panthera pardus tullian (Turkey, Caucasus) Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Other subspecies recorded in the past Caucasus Leopard: Panthera pardus ciscaucasica Caucasus Mountains, Turkey, Georgia, Russia Indochinese Leopard: Panthera pardus delacouri China Indian Leopard: Panthera pardus fusca India Panthera pardus millardi Kashmir Panthera pardus pernigra Nepal, Kashmir Zanzibar Leopard: Panthera pardus adersi Zanzibar, Unguja Sinai Leopard:   Panthera pardus jarvisi Sinai Peninsula Somali Leopard:   Panthera pardus nanopardus Somalia, Ethiopia Panthera pardus pardus Ethiopia, Sudan, Kenya, Congo Panthera pardus suahelica East Africa Panthera pardus melanotica Southern Africa Panthera pardus sindica South West Africa What are the present numbers of existing Leopard species? Leopard:   Panthera pardus Unknown Least Concern North Chinese Leopard:   Panthera pardus japonensis Unknown Endangered EN C2a Sri Lankan Leopard:   Panthera pardus kotiya Unknown Endangered EN C2a Javan Leopard:   Panther pardus melas Unknown Endangered EN C2a North Persian (Iranian) Leopard:   Panthera pardus saxicolor Unknown Endangered EN C2a Arabian Leopard: Panthera pardus nimr 15-100 Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Amur Leopard:   Panthera pardus orientalis 25-40 Critically endangered CR A2c; D North African (Barbary) Leopard:   Panthera pardus panthera 0 (extinct?)-250 Last viewed 1993 Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Anatolian Leopard:   Panthera pardus tullian 0 (extinct?)-15 Last viewed 1974 Critically endangered CR C2a (i) Zanzibar Leopard:   Panthera pardus adersi Extinct? Last viewed 1980 Population on island of Unguja is thought to still exist. The   status   of   most   Leopard   populations   remains   a   mystery   until   it appears   to   be   too   late   as   is   happening   with   the   Amur   Leopard   in Russia and China. What are the main areas of concern and what is being done about the status of these Leopards? An   article   published   in   the   EWT   Conservation   magazine   52/2005   was titled    “The    Leopard    Controversy:    Common    Cat    or    Conservation Concern?” The   workshop   was   spurred   on   by   the   fact   that   CITES   increased   the quotas   for   hunting   leopard   at   a   meeting   held   in   Bangkok   in   October 2004.   Quota   allocations   were   increased   from   75   to   150   in   South Africa and   from   100-250   in   Namibia.   This   decision   was   said   to   be   based   on insufficient   ecological   information   that   guides   ‘appropriate’   decision- making   on   leopard   utilisation.   It   was   stated   that   there   is   a   lack   of scientific   data   determining   quotas   on   a   regional   and   national   level   and there     is     huge     uncertainty     on     the     effects     of     removal     on     the demographics of a leopard population. A   second   major   issue   raised   was   that   of   farmer-predator   conflicts.   It was   stated   that   there   is   a   lack   of   resources   to   deal   with   problem   animal management   across   the   country   and   accurate   information   of   illegal take-off   is   almost   non-existent.   The   facts   regarding   leopard   losses   are virtually    impossible    to    determine,    yet    quotas    for    hunting    these incredible   creatures   are   allowed   to   increase.   What   are   the   implications to   a   leopard   population   and   to   all   species   diversity   when   leopards   are removed    from    an    area?    So    many    questions    need    answering    and CBSGSA    stated    that    accurate    knowledge    on    leopard    numbers, population    sizes,    distribution    and    trends    are    seriously    lacking    and management    decisions    regarding    the    future    of    the    species    are constantly    being    based    on    the    little    that    is    available.    Reasonable estimates   on   all   these   aspects   of   leopards   needs   to   be   formulated   to effectively    conserve    the    species.    Major    threats    and    conservation priorities   for   Leopards   and   their   habitat   need   to   be   identified   as   the leopard is said to be the world’s most persecuted big cat. In   order   for   South   Africa   to   make   sound   conservation   or   management decisions   regarding   the   fate   of   the   Leopard,   sufficient   data   on   Leopard biology,    ecological    carrying    capacity,    population    density,    distribution and   dynamics   needs   to   be   formulated.   The   information   gathered   by individuals   is   of   no   use   to   the   species   if   it   is   not   shared   cohesively   and it   is   vital   that   this   occurs   on   a   global   level. All   data   needs   to   be   collated in   order   to   address   priority   gaps   and   not   only   as   a   nation   but   as   a planet,   urgent   attention   can   thus   be   paid   to   the   creature   that   is   both   the most persecuted and one of the most valuable on earth. Leopard   Research   projects   are   ongoing   in   many   of   the   areas   where Leopards    still    exist.    In    the    Southern    Africa    subregion,    the    Cape Leopard    Trust    can    be    found    in    the    Cederberg    Mountains    of    the Western   Cape,   the   Mun-Ya-Wana   Leopard   Project   in   Natal   and   the GLP   Erindi   in   Namibia.   Other   projects   include   that   at   Karongwe   Game Reserve,   the   Waterberg   Carnivore   Project,   Namibia   and   many   years   of ongoing   data   collection   at   Londolozi   in   the   Sabi   Sand   Game   Reserve. Due    to    the    dedicated    people    that    make    these    projects    a    reality, valuable   information   is   uncovered   daily   and   a   better   understanding   of Leopard    ecology    is    sure    to    help    projects    worldwide.    With    sound methods   and   means   of   collecting   accurate   data   on   Leopard   numbers, distribution   maps   can   be   updated   regularly,   population   numbers   can   be assessed   and   sound   decisions   can   be   made   in   the   future   regarding   the management of all the existing subspecies. Projects   in   other   areas   of   the   world   include   WWF   working   in   Russia with   the Amur   Leopard   as   well   as   a   project   in   the   Caucasus   subregion. It   is   not   easy   to   find   information   on   all   Leopard   projects   around   the world   and   one   aim   of   the   GLP   is   to   aid   in   the   information   sharing   and development   of   awareness   through   communication.   We   are   hoping   to achieve    this    through    media    such    as    the    Internet    via    sites    like http://www.globalleopard.com An   important   consideration   to   be   made   is   that   concern   for   Leopards differs    from    one    place    to    another    and    an    important    factor    often overlooked   is   that   of   human   concern   where   Leopards   exist.   Through proper   understanding   of   Leopard   behaviour,   there   may   be   a   way   for man   and   cat   to   live   side   by   side   with   minimal   conflict.   This   has   been proven    in    areas    such    as    the    Sabi    Sands    and    local    surrounding communities   where   people   and   predators   co-exist   in   harmony   and where    they    in    fact    benefit    each    other.    This    can    only    be    achieved however,   if   concern   for   people   and   domestic   stock   go   hand   in   hand with addressing the concerns about Leopards. Understanding Leopard ecology Many   people   working   on   Leopard   research   around   the   world   are   still trying   to   gather   accurate   information   on   Leopard   numbers,   population sizes,   distribution   and   behaviour.   It   has   been   said   that   “insufficient ecological     information     is     guiding     inappropriate     decision     making regarding Leopard utilization”. The   field   work   of   the   GLP   at   Londolozi   Private   Game   Reserve   in   the Sabi   Sands   and   Erindi   Game   Reserve   in   Namibia   aims   to   contribute vital   base   line   information   on   Leopard   ecology   through   data   capture and    analysis.   The    first    field    project    was    that    at    Londolozi.   This    is ongoing   data   collection   that   began   in   1978   contributing   30   years   of information     collected     through     direct     observations     of     habituated Leopards. In   late   2007   the   GLP   Erindi   began   as   the   reserve   completely   ended the   hunting   in   the   area. As   the   Leopards   of   Erindi   and   the   people   begin to    develop    a    relationship,    records    of    how    long    it    takes    for    the population    to    recover    and    for    individuals    to    “trust”    people    will    be determined as part of the studies. Understanding       human/leopard       relationships       in       specific environments Human/leopard   relations   differ   hugely   from   area   to   area,   country   to country.   In   Africa,   major   concerns   with   Leopard   are   those   regarding conflict   mostly   with   domestic   stock.   In   countries   like   India,   the   problem is   similar   in   many   ways   but   there   is   the   added   conflict   regarding   people themselves and the predators. Every   area   of   the   world   still   housing   Leopard   populations   has   its   own concerns    for    the    cats    and    the    people.    It    is    vital    that    relations    be understood   in   order   for   Leopard   research   globally   to   benefit   more   than a    single    population.    The    GLP    will    use    2    very    different    areas    for comparison    work    and    the    dream    of    the    future    is    to    expand    this knowledge worldwide. GLP FOCUS Gathering    and    sharing    of    information    on    leopard    subspecies globally: A   major   focus   of   the   GLP   is   to   offer   ways   for   people   to   share   any information   on   Leopards   that   they   feel   is   important.   We   hope   to   form contact   with   other   people   around   the   world   that   have   an   interest   in ensuring survival of these cats into the future. The   first   major   project   being   planned   involves   the   local   people   of Afrca and   the   critically   endangered Amur   Leopard   of   Russia.   The   trackers   of Londolozi   played   a   vital   role   in   the   habituation   of   Leopards   of   the   Sabi Sands   area   where   today   some   of   the   very   best   wildlife   viewing   is available,   and   it   would   be   a   huge   inspiration   for   them   to   see   how   there tracking   skills   have   already   and   can   benefit   other   Leopards,   not   only   in Africa   but   all   over   the   planet.   In   the   same   light,   perhaps   the   tracking team    will    have    some    ideas    of    their    own    on    how    other    Leopard populations   can   be   followed   more   easily   and   located   for   research   and protection in the future. Accurate distribution information: Through   sharing   of   information   and   good   sound   research   techniques from   around   the   globe   and   projects   such   as   that   of   getting   the   highly skilled   trackers   into   remote   areas,   more   accurate   data   especially   on Leopard   subspecies   and   distribution   will   only   improve.   This   information should   be   far   easier   to   find   and   if   every   person   involved   with   Leopards or   even   those   that   simply   have   a   passion   for   them,   shared   what   they knew, a global awareness would be created. Awareness   is   the   first   step   towards   protection   and   understanding   of   all creatures. Accurate   information   on   the   numbers   of   subspecies   both   in   the wild and in captivity: If   Leopard   ecology   was   well   understood,   there   would   be   far   more accurate    information    on    the    status    of    these    cats    worldwide.    The Leopard   is   renowned   for   being   extremely   elusive   and   difficult   to   find and   especially   to   count.   With   teamwork,   new   and   improved   methods for    counting    Leopards    will    arise    and    through    better    understanding, other   methods   of   determining   population   and   status   of   these   creatures will   ensure   that   utilization   is   sustainable   and   management   decisions made   regarding   the   fate   of   the   Leopard   will   be   done   so   based   on accurate information. Identification   of   the   main   areas   of   concern   and   existing   projects working   to   gather   information   about   the   populations   in   various areas: Through   the   identification   of   main   areas   of   concern,   the   story   of   people out   there   in   the   wilderness   trying   to   make   a   difference   with   very   little help   can   be   heard.   Funding   for   research   in   remote   areas   is   always difficult   to   come   by.   The   GLP   would   like   to   be   part   of   making   sure   that the   stories   of   those   working   to   better   understand   Leopards   are   easy   to find   and   heard   by   everyone!   There   are   so   many   people   in   the   world who   would   like   to   make   a   difference   to   the   lives   of   other   creatures.   If these   people   can   easily   access   the   information   on   all   projects   and   the phenomenal    researchers    conducting    them,    then    perhaps    help    and funding   will   become   easier   to   access.   If   people   know   and   believe   in what   is   happening   “out   of   site”,   out   there   in   the   remote   areas   of   the world,   they   are   able   to   be   a   part   of   making   a   real   difference.   Each   one of us has a contribution to make, no matter how small it may seem. Ongoing   Leopard   research   in   various   areas   to   gather   and   process information on the ecology of Leopards: The   purpose   of   research   is   to   ensure   that   information   gathered   through the   GLP   projects   is   done   so   in   the   correct   way   and   in   a   format   that   can be   beneficial   to   all   those   working   with   these   incredible   cats   in   the present   and   in   the   also   in   the   future.   Yes,   we   would   like   to   know   every thing   that   there   is   to   know   about   Leopards   but   if   this   information   is gathered   and   not   shared   in   the   right   way,   it   will   be   of   no   use   to   future Leopard    populations.   The    “scientific”    approach    will    ensure    that    the information gathered over many life times, can be used constructively. Gathering    of    information    to    create    an    understanding    on    the relationship   between   Leopard   and   humans   in   different   areas   of the world: Part   of   the   research   project   at   Erindi   is   to   build   relations   between Leopards   and   people   in   such   a   way   that   the   cats   accept   man   into   their life.   The   process   of   habituation   will   allow   guests   of   the   future   to   view these   creatures   in   their   natural   habitat   without   disturbing   them   in   any way.   Through   habituation,   the   Leopards   can   “earn”   a   living   and   ensure that   their   home   remains   in   a   state   where   they   can   dwell   safely   today and also tomorrow. Natasha de Woronin ©
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