Erindi   started   life   as   a   farm   in   central   Namibia,   but   as   time   lingered,   the   farm   slowly   moved   into   an   era   of   game   hunting   of   all animals   and   through   this,   many   species   that   were   no   longer   at   Erindi   were   re-introduced   back   into   their   natural   habitat.   This   led   to a   very   positive   outcome   for   the   environment   and   in   2007   it   was   decided   that   Erindi   was   to   become   a   conservation   area   and   the complete change over from hunting to ecotourism began. In   mid   2007,   the   last   ever   Leopard   hunt   occurred   and   by   the   last   months   of   the   year,   all   hunting   ended   completely   and   the   new venture of protecting wildlife started. More   than   40   Leopards   were   hunted   during   the   hunting   phase   and   this   opened   a   very   interesting   aspect   to   Leopard   research   and posed   many   questions.   What   effects   does   hunting   have   on   the   genetics   and   breeding   of   a   natural   population?   Almost   all   the Leopards    hunted    were    males    and    it    seems    that    males    are    the    main    protectors    of    their    own    cubs    in    natural    areas.    What repercussions   has   this   had   on   the   territories   and   the   numbers   of   the   population?   We   hope   time   will   reveal   this   valuable   information and that we can learn something about the effects of hunting. A   spectacular   game   lodge   called   “Erindi   Old   Traders   Post”   was   created   and   hunting   vehicles   were   replaced   with   comfortable   game viewers.   Ongoing   work   with   the   Leopards   involves   building   a   positive   relationship   with   these   cats   so   that   visitors   will   have   the chance to see them in their natural environment. Combining   of   Leopard   research   and   habituation   makes   an   exciting   experience   and   unbelievably   within   a   short   period   of   the   project beginning,   a   few   of   the   Leopards   began   to   accept   people   and   vehicles   into   their   silent   world.   The   change   that   the   farm   underwent opened   new   doors   for   the   local   people   of   the   area   and   training   of   game   rangers/wildlife   guides   also   began.   We   hope   that   the   work will   continue   for   a   long   time   and   that   a   plan   to   protect   Leopards   can   in   the   future   be   connected   to   benefiting   both   the   predators   and the people that share the same world. Erindi   is   surrounded   by   farms   with   domestic   stock   and   it   is   very   exciting   that   the   farms   and   the   reserve   are   beginning   to   work together   to   find   a   way   for   Leopard   to   benefit   them   rather   than   cause   conflict. This   has   all   led   to   a   new   world   for   the   Erindi   Leopards as well as the residents of the area and guests of the future.
The History of Erindi
© The Global Leopard Project
GLOBAL LEOPARD PROJECT www.globalleopard.com The Global Leopard Project
Erindi   started   life   as   a   farm   in   central   Namibia,   but   as   time   lingered,   the farm    slowly    moved    into    an    era    of    game    hunting    of    all    animals    and through    this,    many    species    that    were    no    longer    at    Erindi    were    re- introduced   back   into   their   natural   habitat.   This   led   to   a   very   positive outcome   for   the   environment   and   in   2007   it   was   decided   that   Erindi   was to   become   a   conservation   area   and   the   complete   change   over   from hunting to ecotourism began. In   mid   2007,   the   last   ever   Leopard   hunt   occurred   and   by   the   last   months of    the    year,    all    hunting    ended    completely    and    the    new    venture    of protecting wildlife started. More   than   40   Leopards   were   hunted   during   the   hunting   phase   and   this opened   a   very   interesting   aspect   to   Leopard   research   and   posed   many questions.   What   effects   does   hunting   have   on   the   genetics   and   breeding of   a   natural   population?   Almost   all   the   Leopards   hunted   were   males   and it   seems   that   males   are   the   main   protectors   of   their   own   cubs   in   natural areas.    What    repercussions    has    this    had    on    the    territories    and    the numbers    of    the    population?    We    hope    time    will    reveal    this    valuable information and that we can learn something about the effects of hunting. A   spectacular   game   lodge   called   “Erindi   Old   Traders   Post”   was   created and    hunting    vehicles    were    replaced    with    comfortable    game    viewers. Ongoing   work   with   the   Leopards   involves   building   a   positive   relationship with   these   cats   so   that   visitors   will   have   the   chance   to   see   them   in   their natural environment. Combining    of    Leopard    research    and    habituation    makes    an    exciting experience    and    unbelievably    within    a    short    period    of    the    project beginning,   a   few   of   the   Leopards   began   to   accept   people   and   vehicles into   their   silent   world.   The   change   that   the   farm   underwent   opened   new doors     for     the     local     people     of     the     area     and     training     of     game rangers/wildlife   guides   also   began.   We   hope   that   the   work   will   continue for   a   long   time   and   that   a   plan   to   protect   Leopards   can   in   the   future   be connected   to   benefiting   both   the   predators   and   the   people   that   share   the same world. Erindi   is   surrounded   by   farms   with   domestic   stock   and   it   is   very   exciting that   the   farms   and   the   reserve   are   beginning   to   work   together   to   find   a way   for   Leopard   to   benefit   them   rather   than   cause   conflict.   This   has   all led   to   a   new   world   for   the   Erindi   Leopards   as   well   as   the   residents   of   the area and guests of the future.
The History of Erindi
© The Global Leopard Project
GLOBAL LEOPARD PROJECT www.globalleopard.com The Global Leopard Project